Tag Archives: venice

Bio Wine Tasting at the Monaco

Wine enthusiasts who happen to be in town on Sunday, February 13th can participate in a tasting of a plethora of bio and biodynamic wines of the region, offered by AIS (Associazione Italiana di Sommeliers) at the Hotel Monaco & Grand Canal. €15 entrance fee includes your tasting glass; there are guided tastings (in Italian) at 11am and 5pm by reservation only (send requests to aisveneto [at] libero.it).

  • When: Sunday, February 13
  • Where: Hotel Monaco Grand Canal
  • 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. (producers start packing up at 6pm, though)
  • guided tastings at 11 am & 5pm (€10 ea, in Italian, by reservation only aisveneto [at] libero.it
  • €15 entrance fee includes tasting glass

 

The Closing of the Rialto Fish Market? Sign the petition to Just Say No.

Relocation of the Tronchetto Wholesale Market to Fusina Announced

The Loss of the Pescheria Rialto Fish Market Appalls Fisherman, Locals, Travelers

Below you’ll find an article that Google and I translated from the original in La Nuova Venezia. I’ve added some comments for clarification, and although I’ve done some nosing around, I don’t feel like I have enough info to feel completely informed. I hate to jump to conclusions, but just in case it might help…please SIGN the PETITION to let the powers that be know that even though you may not live in the city, the Rialto Fish Market is important to you. (The petition is in Italian, but fairly straightforward — see additional instructions at the end of the article.)

The longer I live here, the more I am convinced that this fish is some of the sweetest and freshest to be found anywhere. Moving the wholesale market to Fusina would certainly increase the cost of fish (already high) and for fishermen make the logistics of transport to the central market at the Rialto impractical and cost prohibitive. Keep in mind that the fish you find at the Rialto (and at other markets in the city) are more often that not, still alive, because they’ve just been delivered fresh from the catch. How many other fish markets can make this claim?

If you have an opinion, please register it by signing the petition, at least. Tell all the cruise passengers you know, too — it’s the Port that’s organizing this move. What a shame.

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From the original article published in La Nuova Venezia (Alberto Vitucci), with additional comments and clarifications:

VENICE. The Rialto is at risk of losing one of its most famous symbols: the Pescheria, or fish market.

This could be the eventual outcome of the announced transfer of the wholesale market from Tronchetto to Fusina, the former Alumix areas. Located away from the “living” lagoon, it’s practically inaccessible to fishermen and traders in Venice.

[Note: Fusina is over 3.5 miles SW of Tronchetto, the current location of the Venice wholesale fish market, just beyond Piazzale Roma. The new location would be build on land, not located on the lagoon. It’s an industrial area inappropriate for fishing.]

And it’s more than a hypothesis, given that Port Authority’s drawings and plans for the new land structure are already being passed around among experts. The operators of the Fish Market, fifteen companies that supply fresh fish for retail throughout the city, are preparing for battle.

“We’ve requested an urgente meeting with the Mayor Giorgio Orsoni,” they say, “we’ll explain that the transfer of the wholesale market will decree the death of the Pescheria and the Rialto Market.”

The project is entering its operational phase. For some time the Port Authority, owner of the area where there wholesale market stands, has reclaimed possession. The parking area in front of the market is to become a roundabout at the exit from the Marittima cruise port. And the area now occupied by the fish market will be transformed into new facilities for large cruise ships, given the proximity of the docks.

It’s a project that risks being “devastating” for the city and in particular for the fish market at the Pescheria [which has existed at the Rialto — the center of all economic activity and commercial life of the Venetian Republic from its inception, before the year 1000.], say the fisherman.

For retailers to reach the city center from Fusina would be impossible and impractical. The reason is the distance of Fusina from the city, the lagoon, and the market itself. The lagoon fisherman [many from Burano, for example, at the opposite end of the lagoon, 10 miles or 16 km from the new wholesale market] will hardly be able get the fish across the lagoon to Fusina, then back to the Pescheria in the city’s center in time for retail sale — especially in inclement weather, in winter, in open boats, facing a bora or garbin wind. Today they go directly by boat from Tronchetto to Rialto. To transport fish from Fusina would demand both truck and boat — too much time and cost prohibitive.

The first consequence of the relocation would be the increase of fish from abroad and even frozen [abhored by locals, as it immediately reduces the quality for which Venice is famous] and reduction of the native species available from the lagoon.

Finally Fusina, located in an industrial zone, is not an ideal place for trade in fish, an activity that had taken place for centuries in the lagoon waters and Rialto.

Perhaps more convenient for Padova, the new location of the wholesale market would be prohibitive for the Venetian locals, and would represent yet another productive activity evicted from the lagoon through the work of a public institution (the Port).

In addition to the operators of Rialto, however, many citizens and even travelers who love Venice and its wonderful traditions. intend to give battle to avoid the death of a tradition and the closure of the Pescheria, says everyone.

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SIGN THE PETITION.

Go to this link. Enter your first name, last name, e-mail, and a password. You may also enter a comment in English.

You will receive a confirmation link at the e-mail you provided. Just click the link and your signature will be registered. (You’ll see a request for a donation — this has nothing to do with whether your signature will be added, though.)

 

Venice temps rising, as is the sea level

Predicted tide levels mean residents and visitors can expect acqua alta while preparing for Christmas in Venice.

A text message from Centro Marea this morning announced the predicted tide levels for the next several days. Though the worst will arrive, like Santa, in the wee hours of the night, it’s still something to be aware of as you wend your way through the city enjoying holiday cheer. Just don your Christmas boots and you should be fine:

  • Thu, Dec 23, 115 cm at 11:10 a.m.
  • Fri, Christmas Eve, 130 cm at 1 a.m.
  • Fri, Christmas Eve day, 110 cm at noon

…all to be accompanied by cloudy skies and steady rains. It seems the snowfall that the rest of Europe and Italy has been experiencing will be coming our way in liquid form, from above and below.

To get an idea of the effect high tides have on the city:

  • Normal tide is under 80 cm.
  • At 100 cm., 5% of the surface in the historic center is covered: minor interruption of normal activity
  • At 110 cm., marea sostenuta covering 14%: medium interruption.
  • At 120 cm., marea molto sostenuta covering 30% of the city’s surface: high level of interruption, code yellow
  • At 130 cm., marea molto sostenuta covering 45%: significant interruption, code orange
  • At 140 cm., marea eccezionale covering 55%: exceptional interruption, code red
  • At 150 cm., marea eccezionale covering 65% of the city surface
  • At 160 cm., marea eccezionale: over 70% of the city’s surface is covered — we are effectively at sea.

For tides of 110 cm or higher, sirens will sound 3-4 hours in advance. Anything over 140 cm is world news and people start showing up in costumes and body paint with motorized surfboards and the like trying to get their picture in somebody’s Daily News or as part of a viral Youtube video.

Should you bring boots? Nah. Just make sure your lodging has them ready for you. Worse case, you can pick up a pair here for about €15 and save yourself lots of luggage space.

Remember too, that it’s a tide, and the most significant interruptions will be for about four hours as it approaches is peak and then recedes once again.

For more info, see the English version of the Comune’s Instituzione Centro Provisioni e Segnalazioni Marea.

A Millennium of Glass Mastery at the Correr

“The Adventure of Glass,” a brilliant exhibition of Venetian glass and the largest of its type since 1982, is at the Museo Correr through April 25th.

Most everyone who comes to Venice knows that Murano is famous for art glass production, though not many know why, or even what distinguishes it from any other sort of glass. Too few visitors portion out their limited time to become even mildly informed of the fascinating +1000-year history of Venetian glass — short of taking a “free” taxi ride offered by every lodging and guide in the city to a single commissioning furnace. What a pity.

Fear not, curious visitor: fi you’re traveling to Venice through April 25th, you’ll want to take in “The Adventure of Glass.” It’s a captivating and inspired exhibition at the Museo Correr, a reworked continuation of the one just ended at the Castello del Buonconsiglio in Trento.

The exhibition coincides with the imminent celebration of the 150th anniversary of the Museo del Vetro on Murano (a too often overlooked introduction to Murano glass), founded in 1861 by Abbot Zanetti, whose permanent collection houses many of the works on view at the Correr.

One of the most fascinating and surprising portions of the exhibit is the ancient glass recovered from lagoon and canal beds – on display for the first time, and attesting to just how long glass has been an integral part of the Venetian identity. They comprise some of the over three hundred objects you’ll peruse that include archeological glass (Roman and early Venetian), works from the Golden Age of the 15th-16th centuries to the inventive 17th and 18th centuries applying its elaborate, imaginative ingenuity to both form and material composition. After the subsequent decline, the modern renaissance of the 19th-20th centuries demonstrate how designers and glass masters began to collaborate to combine contemporary perspectives with the art form’s rich past to not only revive, but re-invent it with ingenious new techniques.

Note too, that during Carnevale (from the first week in February), over one hundred more items from the Maschietto collection will be added: presented in Venice for the first time, and combined with a selection of 18th century drawings from the Correr collections appropriate to Carnevale.

The Adventure of Glass: A Millennium of Venetian Art
Museo Correr, Piazza San Marco
Through April 25th, 2011
10am – 6pm, last entrance pm
Tickets €8 / €5 reduced

Click the image below to view the slideshow:

Photographs © Nan McElroy