The Triumphant Return of the Trionfo

Il Nuovo Trionfo - Trabaccolo a Venezia

Il Nuovo Trionfo - Trabaccolo a VeneziaWaterborne once again after much needed maintenance carried out at the shipyard Cantiere Casaril Sant’Alvise (the last one of its kind left in town for repair of vessels of this type).

The Nuovo Trionfo will be present at the Arsenale from April 24 – 26 on Open Arsenale 2015.

Everyone is invited to come aboard to inspect the work just completed, and also to become a member of the Club Amici del Nuovo Trionfo. Your dues will help to support the initiative for continued renovation of the historic vessel. They will also entitle you to

  • get on board and join the crew after a brief training
  • participate and / or organize private events (birthdays, parties, presentations, events, toast etc.).
  • participate in the short excursions in the lagoon on the dates organized for members
  • participate in the work of minor maintenance on board: painting, cleaning, light carpentry, interior, sails, halyards, ropes, rigging, etc. There is something for everyone who can work with his hands.

Current Amici are also invited to renew for 2015.

For more about the type of vessel, see the Trabaccolo Wiki page.

Festival Galuppi stops in at the Scuola San Rocco

joy singers consonanzeHow often do you get to hear Baroque and Gospel selections in one concert…in Italy, in an ambience as brilliant and rich as the music itself?

The Festival Galuppi celebrates music of the era in the places frequented by the composer. This year features teh Joy Singers performing ‘Consonanza’ with selections of Galuppi, Monteverdi, Handel, an original Magnificat by director Andrea d’Alpaos, along with gospel selections like “This Little Light of Mine”.

Not so little, maybe.

Don’t miss the Joy Singers and ‘Consonanza,’ Thursday, Oct 9, 2014; 8:30pm at the Scuola San Rocco (just behind the Frari). Tickets €15, at APT offices, the Fenice Theatre or at the venue on the day of the performance.

See you there.

 

Free Christmas Concert at Teatro Malibran, Sunday, Dec 18

The holiday concert features Laurentius Dinca, the first violinist of the Berlin Philharmonic and the Accademia Musicale di San Giorgio, Fondazione Cini Orchestra.

The Teatro Malibran is La Fenice’s smaller, more intimate sister theatre named for the Spanish opera singer Maria Malibran. It’s located just behind the Chiesa S. Giovanni Crisostomo along the calle of the same name, not far from Fiaschetteria Toscana. The program includes:

  • two Mendelssohn works, the Symphony for Strings no. 10 and the Concert for Violin and Orchestra in D minor. The soloist is Laurentius Dinca, who plays an Andrea Guarneri violin.
  • Mozart’s Symphony No. 36 “Linz,” is directed by Maestro Alessandro Tortato of the Accademia Musicale di San Giorgio.

The (about 700) free tickets may be obtained while supplies last at the Teatro La Fenice ticket office on Saturday, Dec 17 and Sunday, November 18 between the hours of 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. Remaining tickets will be available at the Teatro Malibran on Sunday from 6 p.m. until the concert begins.

Teatro Malibran
Sunday, Dec. 18
8 p.m.

The concert is sponsored by the Provincia di Venice with the support of the Casa di Risparmio di Venezia.

 

Press and Communication:
Telephone: 041.2501715 – 1666 – 1689 – 1584
Fax: 041.9651628
E-mail: ufficio.stampa@provincia.venezia.it
Website: www.provincia.venezia.it
Responsible: Patricia Salvaterra
Referee: Pierluigi Tamburrini

Biennale Time — still.

With 89 participating nations, 37 collateral venues, the Venice 54th Biennale International Art Exhibition is diverse, expansive…
and still around til November 27.

The frenzied, fervent opening of ILLUMInations, the 54th Biennale seems far away now. During that week in late June, more than 51,000 visitors were estimated to have strolled among, perused, scrutinized, and analyzed the artistic offerings in the Giardini, Arsenale and the numerous collateral exhibitions strewn across the city. It’s unthinkable that anyone who doesn’t have months here could ever view all the works on display in the main and para-pavillions and city-wide venues, not to mention all the concurrent exhibits not officially associated with the Biennale itself. What’s a time-limited traveller to do?

TO THE GARDENS

You could choose to start in the still slightly leafy Giardini and immerse yourself in MIKE NELSON’s mesmerizing, alternate time-and-space sculptural installation, whose creation involved a complete restructuring of the Great Britain pavilion (the advice you receive as you enter is “Watch your head, and your step”). Afterward, head down the hill to compare it with the intriguing Francia (France) installation by , and with Czech Republic, where you’ll meander through DOMINIK LANG’s captivating intro-retrospective featuring his own contemporary installation of his father’s “sleeping witnesses” from the 1950s.

Don’t miss the Central Pavilion that, unlike dedicated national pavilions, hosts works by a wide assortment of artists. As startling today as it likely was in its own time, TINTORETTO’s “The Last Supper” traveled across the lagoon from its home for the last 420 years at San Giorgio Maggiore to form the centerpiece there along with two other monumental works; MAURIZIO CATTELAN’s Others, stuffed pigeons pervasively perched outside the pavilion and in, perhaps recalling their prevalence in Piazza San Marco, keep watch overhead. They contrast markedly with the “invisible painting” of Swiss/New York artist BRUNO JACOB, created with, among other things, water and steam.

Cross the canal bridge to reach the Austrian pavilion. It’s not necessary to understand the precise intention of MARKUS SCHINWALD’s intriguing yet subtly disturbing juxtapositions of time, subject matter, and artistic medium to be drawn in by them; the labyrinth of corridors that presents each work contributes significantly to their effect.

The Greek pavilion offers DOHANDI’s profound, minimalist respite at the opposite end of the park, Poland’s YAEL BARTANA has expertly crafted the tongue-in-cheek  …and Europe will be Stunned, a three-video presentation; 30 days of Running in the Space is EGYPT’s tribute to beloved artist and activist AHMED BASIONY, who was downed by snipers in Tahrir Square on the Friday of Wrath.

ARSENALE

If you instead choose to tour the Arsenale which features a number of emerging countries this year, you may choose to turn the corner at the end of the Corderie and take in a bit of “The Clock,” Swiss-American CHRISTIAN MARCLAY’s 24-hour film in which every clip refers to the actual time of day. It’s a masterfully edited piece relating past to present that will engross you for as long as you choose to stay and watch.

IT’S EVERYWHERE YOU ARE

The Biennale extends far beyond the confines of the garden pavilions and Arsenale, installed in some of the most evocative and rarely accessible venues in the city. Take vaporetto Line 62 from the Giardini Biennale stop to Spirito Santo on the Zattere; you’ll be deposited directly in front of the Emporio die Sali, the old salt warehouses (themselves worthy of a visit even without the art). There you’ll find “The Future of a Promise,” a pan-Arab collateral exhibition featuring 22 artists and presenting an extraordinary range of refined works that soar through the expansive warehouse space. Across town at the Scuola della Misericordia is Jan FABRE’s striking Pietas, an installation consisting of marble sculpture reflected in golden flooring — an impressive building in its own right that could not have been put to much more impressive use.

BEYOND the BIENNALE

Finally, TRA: The Edge of Becoming is not a part of the 54th Biennale — but could easily be (they even have the same closing dates). The impeccable renovation of the Palazzo Fortuny  makes it an extraordinary exhibition structure, and one of the few that could display TRA’s over 300 works in any coherent way. Artists represented include notables Rodin, Duchamp, Fontana, Kapoor, and Lèger to name a few, with many contemporary artists’ works commissioned specifically for the exhibition.

There are few visitors who wouldn’t enjoy adding this edition of the Biennale to their itinerary anytime before November 27th. For the frequent visitor, it adds a present day dimension to an already beloved destination.

54th Biennale Venice International Art Exhibition

thru Nov 27th, 2011
10 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Closed Mondays (except  August 15th, October 31st and November 21st, 2011)

€20 (full), discounts for students and seniors.

Entrance fees for collateral exhibitions vary (many are free)

Giardini

Giardini Biennale (Lines 41/42, Lines 51/52, Lines 61/62)
Giardini (Line 1)

Arsenale

Entrance, Calle della Tana
Arsenale (Line 1, 41/42)

There is a Biennale Navetta transfer from the Giardini to the Arsenale; and also a shortcut between the back of the Giardini and and top of the Arsenale.

A Rower’s Redentore

It’s a whole different Redentore at water level, in the area designated for row boats only, just in front of the exclusive (and expensive) private party along the fondamenta at the Punta della Dogana.

The moon was full and the weather ideal — more like May than July. Music from decadent disco barges each completing to have its entertainment reign supreme wafted across the water, while we picnicked on a combination of traditional and contemporary dishes in boats decorated with frasche fresche (fresh branches) and multicolored lanterns that grew brighter as the sky darkened. About dessert time, kayakers began to appear like floating firecracking-seeking fireflies, their headlamps flashing as they bobbed about among the mass of anchored craft. Gondole threaded their way among boats of all sizes seeking the ideal spot from which to view the upcoming pyrotechnics (though it’s hard to find a bad one).

These photos are hardly tack-sharp, a difficult thing to attain from atop one floating vessel shooting more of the same — but you’ll get the idea. It was truly a spectacular display (with plenty of red, white and green this year, to commemorate Italy’s 150th anniversary) from sequences of more subtle pah-pah-pah-pah-pop cannon shots that seem to race along the canal’s edge, to a canopies of explosions that seemed to span the entire night sky, campanile to campanile, riva to riva. It went something like this…

Venice Redentore 2011 – Images by Nan McElroy

And for a truly spectacular video perspective, see

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